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Showing posts from November, 2021

Enabling Developer Reference for Visualization Components

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Oracle Analytics 6.3 is bringing updated Developer Reference feature that is now directly accessible when creating an analysis in a workbook. Developer Reference has already been available before with JSON or XML generated code of visualization objects, code snippets for embedding visualizations in other portals, and other. With built-in Performance Tools can be now used to analyze statistics such as query time, server time, and streaming time for visualization components in workbooks. Users can now review the logical and physical queries and check the execution log. In order to access  Performance Tools  under  Developer option  from the  Menu ( top right corner ). Developer option has been, as I said, known from before, but now it includes the Performance Tools section which provides developer quite useful information about visualisation execution performance. But be aware,  Developer  option in the  Menu  is not enabled by default. It has to be enabled. This can be done by naviga

Issue with using AGO function in My Calculations

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Recently I wanted to do a short demo on how to use Time Series functions in My Calculations in Oracle Analytics , more specifically how to create a new calculation using Ago function in Data Visualization workbook . Very straightforward, one would say, however, it is not.  There is a known bug , quite well documented in Oracle Support, however, let me describe it briefly and provide a short workaround. Let’s start with this simple report: Now, let’s create a new calculation that uses AGO function, which has the following notation: Ago(<<Measure>>, <<Level>>, <<Number of Periods>>) There is no secret about that, right? Well, there might be some … As I mentioned, when you create a new calculation in Data Visualization workbook, you need to be careful when typing the <<Level>> part of the formula. For example, if you follow the standard notation, then the formula should look like this: Note: in the formula above I added extra space betwe

Oracle Analytics 6.3: What's new?

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Just a few night ago our Oracle Analytics instances have been upgraded to the latest version 6.3. In general 6.3 doesn't contain major new features, however there are still some worth mentioning. Workbooks instead of Projects The one that is the most obvious is that we are no longer creating Projects in Data Visualisation, but we work with Workbooks .  Developer Reference During the development process, if you wanted to observe and analyse performance of reports and analyses, you had to navigate to Console and search for your report performance under Session and Query Cache . This is no longer necessary in 6.3. Developers can now review performance statistics for visualisation components right in the Visualize canvas.  You can now analyse statistics such as query time, server time and streaming time for all visualisation components in workbook. Calculate and display Lift and Gain for predictive models Another interesting new feature is an option to evaluate and visualise machine

Working with Graphs in Oracle Analytics - Subgraph, Shortest Path, Clusters

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In my previous post I described, in a bit more details, how to perform graph analysis in the case of Node Ranking. Basically the key tool that you can use in Oracle Analytics is Data Flows . Graph Analytics step in Data Flows enables users to perform four graph analytics operations. Besides Node Ranking these are Sub Graph , Clusters and Shortest Path . For easier understanding and visualisation we are using the following Dolphins dataset. Sub Graph Sub Graph operations finds all nodes within specified number of hops of a given node . Using other words, Sub Graph finds all nodes, neighbours of a given node, if we specify the number of hops is one. If number of hops is two, Sub Graph returns all neighbouring nodes of a given node and all neighbours of found neighbours, and so on. This is for example useful in marketing when we can find who are friends of a customer who has bought a specific product. We might assume that customer presented that product to his friends and is also pos